Press Releases

For Immediate Release: October 14, 2010

NY City Firefighters Launch Radio Campaign to Support Second Hand Smoking Ban

The Uniformed Firefighters Association has launched a month-long radio advertising campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of second hand smoke, supporting Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the New York City Council's current effort to ban smoking in outdoor public spaces. The City Council holds public hearings on the proposed ban October 14.

The radio campaign, which coincides with fire safety month, was debuted over the weekend starting with Mayor Bloomberg's Friday, October 8 show on WOR-AM with host John Gambling. The commercials will run on CBS stations, 1010 WINS, 660 WFAN, as well as 710 WOR and 1050 ESPN. The :60 spot voiced over by UFA President Steve Cassidy includes sound bites from Mayor Bloomberg and Don Distasio, CEO Eastern Division of the American Cancer Society.

Mr. Cassidy said, "The Mayor and City Council's efforts together with the American Cancer Society to curb second hand smoke at beaches, parks and other outdoor public spaces is focused on preventing lung diseases, cancers and other illnesses that stem from exposure to toxins released by smoke. The cost of second hand smoke to our society and for New York City Firefighters - on a human and economic scale - is staggering."

"No one understands the dangers better than New York City's Firefighters, who are exposed to more toxic smoke in one fire than the average citizens is exposed to in a lifetime," Mr. Cassidy added.

According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a division of the U.S. Department of Commerce modern fires grow hotter, faster and more toxic than just 20 years ago due to synthetic materials used in modern home furnishings and which firefighters are exposed to. (Watch the NIST Video)

According to NIST, "In the 1950's the average apartment fire took more than 15 minutes to peak at around 1400 (F) degrees, today they can hit a staggering 2000 degrees."

In the commercial Mayor Bloomberg lists some toxins second hand smoke exposes the human body to. He says, "When you breathe second hand tobacco smoke, you are inhaling a bouquet of arsenic, vinyl, chloride, cyanide, ammonia, benzene, and other toxins and carcinogens that threaten your long term health."

Don Distasio, CEO Eastern Division of the American Cancer Society adds, "There is no safe level of exposure to second hand smoke, not inside, not outside, not anywhere. Second hand smoke causes cancer. It is a class A carcinogen, it is a killer."

Mr. Cassidy concludes the spot stating, "The truth is that New York City Firefighters inhale more toxic smoke at one fire, than the average citizen's exposure to a lifetime of second hand smoke. This is just another reminder that New York City Firefighters have the most dangerous job in America."

The commercial can be heard by clicking: HERE

SCRIPT:

UFA "SECOND HAND SMOKE" COMMERCIAL (:60)

This is Steve Cassidy, President of the Uniformed Firefighters Association of New York.

Mayor Bloomberg and the city council want to ban smoking in public spaces in the City of New York because second hand smoke kills thousands every year.

(CUT TO Bloomberg Audio Clip (0:42- :55) - 13 Seconds) ["When you breathe second hand tobacco smoke, you are inhaling a bouquet of arsenic, vinyl, chloride, cyanide, ammonia, benzene, and other toxins and carcinogens that threaten your long term health."]

We think the Mayor is Right.

So is the CEO of the American Cancer Society who said:

(CUT TO American Cancer Society Clip [15:30-15:44 - 14] Seconds/Don Distasio, CEO Eastern Division) ["There is no safe level of exposure to second hand smoke, not inside, not outside, not anywhere. Second hand smoke causes cancer. It is a class A carcinogen, it is a killer."]

The truth is that New York City Firefighters inhale more toxic smoke at one fire, than the average citizen's exposure to a lifetime of second hand smoke.

This is just another reminder that New York City Firefighters have the most dangerous job in America.

A Message from the Uniformed Firefighters Association.